• A grand jury in Ohio decided not to charge Brittany Watts, 34, with abuse of a corpse in connection with her handling of a home miscarriage.
  • The case gained national attention for its potential implications on reproductive health care access and the legal status of fetuses.
  • Watts had visited a Catholic hospital twice before the miscarriage, where her doctor advised inducing labor due to a nonviable fetus and a risk of harm.

An Ohio woman facing a criminal charge for her handling of a home miscarriage will not be charged, a grand jury decided Thursday.

The Trumbull County prosecutor’s office said grand jurors declined to return an indictment for abuse of a corpse against Brittany Watts, 34, of Warren, resolving a case that had sparked national attention for its implications for pregnant women as states across the country hash out new laws governing reproductive health care access.

The announcement came hours before her supporters planned a “We Stand With Brittany!” rally on Warren’s Courthouse Square.

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A municipal judge had found probable cause to bind over Watts’ case. That was after city prosecutors said she miscarried, flushed and scooped out the toilet, then left the house, leaving the 22-week-old fetus lodged in the pipes. Her attorney told the judge Watts had no criminal record and was being “demonized for something that goes on every day.” An autopsy determined the fetus died in utero and identified “no recent injuries.”

The Trumbull County Courthouse is seen on Oct. 16, 2020, in Warren, Ohio. Brittany Watts, an Ohio woman facing a criminal charge for her handling of a home miscarriage, will not be charged, a grand jury decided on Jan. 11, 2024. (AP Photo/David Dermer, File)

Watts had visited Mercy Health-St. Joseph’s Hospital, a Catholic facility in working-class Warren, about 60 miles southeast of Cleveland, twice in the days leading up to her miscarriage. Her doctor had told her she was carrying a nonviable fetus and to have her labor induced or risk “significant risk” of death, according to records of her case.

Due to delays and other complications, her attorney said, she left each time without being treated. After she miscarried, she tried to go to a hair appointment, but friends sent her to the hospital. A nurse called 911 to report a previously pregnant patient had returned reporting, “the baby’s in her backyard in a bucket.”

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That call launched a police investigation that led to the eventual charge against Watts.

Warren Assistant Prosecutor Lewis Guarnieri told Municipal Court Judge Terry Ivanchak the issue wasn’t “how the child died, when the child died” but “the fact the baby was put into a toilet, was large enough to clog up the toilet, left in the toilet, and she went on (with) her day.”

Her attorney Traci Timko said in an interview that Ohio’s abuse-of-corpse statute lacks clear definitions, including what is meant by “human corpse” and what constitutes “outrage” to the reasonable family and community sensibilities.

When Ivanchak bound the case over, he said, “There are better scholars than I am to determine the exact legal status of this fetus, corpse, body, birthing tissue, whatever it is.”



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